l'oubli virginia
mpdrolet:

Swimmer’s pool, Wolfsburg, c. 1958
Heinrich Heidersberger

mpdrolet:

Swimmer’s pool, Wolfsburg, c. 1958

Heinrich Heidersberger

mpdrolet:

Southsea Pier, England, 1981
Romano Cagnoni

mpdrolet:

Southsea Pier, England, 1981

Romano Cagnoni

(Source: iyrics, via fastcodesign)

humansofnewyork:

"Studying the brain is like working in a toy store. Nothing could be more fucking fun.""What do you think is the greatest weakness of the brain?""That’s a lousy question! I’m not answering it.""Why is it a lousy question?""What do you want me to say? Road rage? That we get pissed and shoot people? That the newest parts of our brain should have been in the oven a little longer? How’s that going to help you? If you ask a crappy question, you’ll never get a decent answer. You need to ask smaller questions— questions that give you a pathway to finding some pertinent information. The major advances in brain science don’t come from asking crappy questions like ‘What is Consciouness?’ They come from microanalysis. They come from discovering pertinent information at the cellular level."

humansofnewyork:

"Studying the brain is like working in a toy store. Nothing could be more fucking fun."
"What do you think is the greatest weakness of the brain?"
"That’s a lousy question! I’m not answering it."
"Why is it a lousy question?"
"What do you want me to say? Road rage? That we get pissed and shoot people? That the newest parts of our brain should have been in the oven a little longer? How’s that going to help you? If you ask a crappy question, you’ll never get a decent answer. You need to ask smaller questions— questions that give you a pathway to finding some pertinent information. The major advances in brain science don’t come from asking crappy questions like ‘What is Consciouness?’ They come from microanalysis. They come from discovering pertinent information at the cellular level."

(via freshphotons)

newyorker:

Two of the women in Garry Winogrand’s 1964 photograph “World’s Fair, New York City” recollect that summer afternoon.
Courtesy Garry Winogrand/Fraenkel Gallery

newyorker:

Two of the women in Garry Winogrand’s 1964 photograph “World’s Fair, New York City” recollect that summer afternoon.

Courtesy Garry Winogrand/Fraenkel Gallery

(Source: newyorker.com)

Some people enter your life in a whirlwind and no matter how hard you try you can’t stop thinking about them, even after they leave…especially after they leave.
F. Scott Fitzgerald (via senyahearts)

(Source: , via senyahearts)